Windows microsoft 7 understanding windows automatic updating

If you disable automatic updates for Firefox, Flash, Adobe Reader, or other important software, you should go turn them back on right now. In Windows XP and Windows Vista, your computer might automatically install updates while you get up for a coffee break and have rebooted itself by the time you get back.

You could lose all your work if you weren’t there to stop the 10-minute automatic reboot countdown.

We don’t have any good data that tells us this, but it’s a minuscule percentage of people.

On the other hand, there are millions and millions of computers that are part of botnets, often because they refused to install security updates and ended up infected.

Attackers now know the problem and can rush to start exploiting it as soon as possible before people update.

You want Windows Update to install those updates for you automatically.

For software like your web browser and browser plug-ins, you also want to leave automatic updates enabled — thankfully, that’s the default these days.

To do this, visit the Windows Update settings in the Control Panel and uncheck the “Give me recommended updates the same way I receive important updates” checkbox.

Even if you consider yourself an advanced Windows geek who knows what you’re doing, this is especially critical if you’re setting up someone else’s computer.

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This led to many people disabling those automatic updates. Windows 7 and 8 are configured to install updates at more convenient times, often when you reboot or shut down your PC if possible.

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